Page 133

AfrikaUK

NOTES 1 Sources: Data is drawn from the UNESCO onliner esource: http://data.uis.unesco.org/#. Accessed on 22 April 2015. 2 Dunne, A. and Raby, F. (2013): Speculative Everything. Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press; UNDESA (2013) World Economic and Social Survey 2013: Sustainable Development Challenges. New York: United Nations Department of Social and Economic Affairs. 3 Pieterse, E. (2014): Pushing against the frontiers of urban studies in (South) Africa. In Kalagas, A. (ed) Slumlab: Made in Africa. No 9. Zurich: ETH University. 4 Amin, A. and Thirft, N. (2013): Arts of the Political. New Openings for the Left. Durham & London: Duke University Press; Hajer, M. (2014) On being smart about cities. Seven Considerations for a New Urban Planning & Design. In Hajer, M. and Dassen, T. (eds) Smart about Cities. Visualising the challenges of the 21st Century. Rotterdam: nai010 & pbl Publishers. 5 Hardt, M. and Negri, A. (2012): Declaration. Kindle edition. Argo Navis Publishers. 6 Jamal, A. (2010): Terror and the City. In Edjabe, N. and Pieterse, E (eds) (2010) African Cities Reader: Pan-African Practices. Cape Town: Chimurenga Press & African Centre for Cities. 7 In African urban studies, we follow the international convention to draw on United Nations data about urbanisation. However, as Diana Mitlin and David Satterthwaite have convincingly demonstrated, these numbers should be treated with great circumspection because of the differing yardsticks to define urban/rural and the quality of data collection in many countries. See: Mitlin, D. and Satterthwaite, D. (2013): Urban poverty in the Global South. Scale and Nature. London: Routledge. 8 These issues are further elaborated in: Parnell, S. and Pieterse, E. (eds) (2014): Africa’s Urban Revolution. London & Cape Town: Zed Books & UCT Press. 9 Sylvia Jaglyn provides an insightful account of how service delivery gets accomplished in predominantly informal African cities. See: Jaglin, S. (2014): Regulating service delivery in southern cities: rethinking urban heterogeneity. In Parnell, S. and Oldfield, S. (eds) The Routledge handbook on cities of the global South. London: Routledge. 10 Provoost, M. (2010): New Towns for the 21st Century: The Planned vs the Unplanned City, in: Provoost, M. (ed.) New Towns for the 21st Century; the Planned vs. the Unplanned City. Amsterdam: SUN Publishers. 11 The reflections in this section were generated through intense discussions with Tau Tavengwa and Mark Swilling. I am obviously solely responsible for the rendition here. 12 Bayat, A. (1997): Uncivil society: The politics of the informal people. Third World Quarterly, Vol. 18(1): 53-72. 13 One attempt at mapping this terrain can be explored in: Pieterse, E. and Simone, A. (eds) (2013): Rogue Urbanism. Emergent African Cities. Johannesburg: Jacana. 14 Watson, V. (2014): African urban fantasies: past lessons and emerging realities. Environment and Urbanization, 26(2): 561-567. 15 Hajer, M. (2014): On being smart about cities. Seven Considerations for a New Urban Planning & Design. In Hajer, M. and Dassen, T. (eds) Smart about Cities. Visualising the challenges of the 21st Century. Rotterdam: nai010 & pbl Publishers. 133 FIGURE 1: FOUR SCENARIOS ON THE FUTURE OF AFRICAN CITIES UNAFFORDABLE & EXCLUSIVE generosity, while also fuelling a rapacious capacity for innovation and economic expansion. The truth is, for adaptive urbanism to get a foothold, we will need thousands of experiments and articulations within and across cities. By paying attention to the emergent intersections of architecture, contemporary art and identity, the Africa exhibition provides at least one staging ground for this kind of speculative labour. Since Africa has no choice but to jump into the future, the experiments in adaptive urbanism that come to pass will reflect the disposition needed globally as cities and nations everywhere come to terms with the implications of a tempestuous, multitudinous and hybrid urban world. This essay is based on support provided by the National Research Foundation and Mistra Urban Futures. Kim Gurney provided invaluable editorial support. GREEN STATUS QUO: Gated enclaves, new towns, pockets of greening + slum upgrading STAUS QUO Small middle-class gated enclaves + slum neglect ADAPTIVE CITY: Smart grids, full access, appropriate tech, localised slum economic   & ecosystem renewal SMART AFRICAN CITY: Smart grids & mobility, compaction, slum upgrading AFFORDABLE & INCLUSIVE Source: author UNAFFORDABLE & SEMI INCLUSIVE


AfrikaUK
To see the actual publication please follow the link above