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ANTENNA A group of antennas attached to the structure with silver kites attached to their tip reflect light keeping the birds away. STRUCTURE CANOPY COLLECTOR WATER TANK The triangulated split bamboo frame provides both robustness and structural strength keeping the overall tower light weight and stable. ROPES BASE Blocks of stone are used as a platform for the Warka. The canopy provides shade creating a gathering place for the community. A triangulated network of polyester ropes is used to add stability to the tall, freestanding structure. Water droplets falling from the Mesh by the force of gravity are cached by the Collector and channelled to the Water Tank. It also works as dew condensor. A 800 gallon (3000 L) tank is used to contain the the harvested water. FUNNEL The water passes from the collector through the filtration system of a Funnel and into the Water Tank. MESH A permeable mesh allows air to pass through the material, capturing water droplets which roll down by gravity. Architecture & Vision / Italy WARKA WATER, ETHIOPIA, 2014 In the highlands of Ethiopia people are living without access to running water and with several hours to the nearest ponds, which are often contaminated. Warka Water is a water collector created by biomimicry – an imitation of nature’s own way of collecting water: such as for instance beetles’ shells, lotus flowers, spider webs. The name originates from the Warka-tree, a huge fig tree which often functions as an important gathering place of the rural societies in Ethiopia. Warka Water is both a water tank and a gathering place. Warka Water is 10 metres high and the load structure is made of bamboo with a web of ropes made of fibres from the banana tree. An inner web of bio-plastic harvesting dew, fog and rainwater collects up to a 100 litres per day. A canopy provides shade imitating the top of the Warkatree under which the community is gathering.


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