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1 Jürgen Habermas, “Modernity: An Unfinished Project”, in The Post-Modern Reader, ed. Charles Jencks, London: Academy Editions, 1992, 158-169. See also revised edition, “Modern and Postmodern Architecture,” in Rethinking Architecture, A Reader in Cultural Theory, ed. Neil Leach, New York: Routledge, 1997, 223-235. 2 See Nnamdi Elleh, ed., Reading the Architecture of Underprivileged Classes, Ashgate, 2014. 3 Jencks, Charles, “Post-Modernism Architecture, from The Language of Postmodern Architecture” (1981) in K. Michael Hays, ed., Architecture Theory Since 1968 (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1998) pp. 306-317; Jürgen Habermas, “Modern and Postmodern Architecture” (1981) in K. Michael Hays, ed., Architecture Theory Since 1968 (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1998) pp. 412- 426; Jean-Francois Lyotard, “Introduction”, The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge, University of Minnesota Press, 1979, vii – xxiii-xxv. 4 The Master Plan for Abuja, the New Federal Capital of Nigeria, op. cit. page 64. Also, see The Mall in Washington, ed. Richard Longstreth, Washington, D.C., and New Haven: National Gallery of Art and Yale University Press, 2002 edition, for more reading on Washington, D.C. See A New Federal Capital for Nigeria. Report No. 2. Site Evaluation and Site Selection, Lagos, Nigeria: January, 1978, p. 64. 5 See Giedion, Sigfried, Space, Time, & Architecture: The Growth of a New Tradition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1967, pp. 818 – 823; Benevolo, Leonardo, History of Modern Architecture, vol. 1, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 148 – 153; Frampton, Kenneth, Modern Architecture, A Critical History, NY: Thames & Hudson, pp. 20 – 28. 6 This topic is well documented in N. Elleh, African Architecture: Evolution And Transformation, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996. 225 web to learn about trends in global knowledge and construction processes. Architectural structures and social spaces in contemporary Africa are commodities in global capitalist exchanges of the same kind as we are experiencing in various other parts of the world. How so? If we study the plethora of objects and social spaces presented in the exhibition critically, we will see that they are dissolved, capitalist, global ‘objects’ and ‘spaces’ from all over the continent and from the world at large. These objects and social spaces thus nullify binary concepts like ‘originality’ and ‘imitation’, ‘tradition’ and ‘modernity’, ‘creativity’ and ‘mimicry’, as well as ‘kitsch’ or pastiche versus ‘innovative design’ in current trends and technological developments. This reading of the works, projects and images in the exhibition interrogates the larger concepts of post-modernism, and there will be an opportunity to expand on it in the future.


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