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Sunday in Brazzaville, 2011 Sapeurs are young Congolese men who try to create new identities for themselves. Through a decadent use of fashion they link the towns of the third world with Paris and Brussels and social impoverishment with psychological salvation. La Sape (fashion) gives authenticity and validity to the search for a new social identity that the African town has been unable to give its mainly young population. In a certain sense La Sape permits the individual Sapeur to define the boundaries that separate them from otherwise inaccessible domains of the world, but at the same time it also serves as a defined social territory that distinguishes Les Sapeurs from the rest of society. COEXISTENCE PERSPECTIVE: Through La Sape the young Congolese thus create a potential for the momentary coexistence of a precarious present in city neighbourhoods with an imaginary future somewhere else. At the same time this crates the possibility 49 of coexistence with an inhospitable social environment. Enric Bach & Adrià Monés / Spain: Sunday in Brazzaville, 2011 The Mozambican house always consists of two architectural forms: the rectangular cement building and the round mud hut. Both buildings are occupied by members of the family. In the rectangular one live family members, while the round mud hit is occupied by the dead of the family, in other words the spirits of the ancestors. COEXISTENCE PERSPECTIVE: The living and the dead are equal members of the family; the only difference is that they live in different realms, the visible (the living) and the invisible (the dead ancestors). The Mozambican house visualizes the coexistence of the living and the dead. The Mozambican House: House for the living and house for the ancestors Jean Claude Moschetti’s photograph shows a person in a traditional Bwa costume and mask, flanked by grain stores. The Bwa are animists, and their masks and costumes have important meanings and functions. They are used for example in connection with rituals meant to ensure a good harvest, when young men and women are to be taught the mysteries of adult life, and not least when the dead are to be escorted from the visible to the invisible world. COEXISTENCE PERSPECTIVE: Moschetti’s work shows us the very specific coexistence of a visible and an invisible world. Jean-Claude Moschetti / France:   Volta Noire – Lopohin #04, Burkina Faso, 2010 Courtesy of the artist


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